Trio

$27.99

ISBN: 978-1-921-924-78-1 Format: 272pp Rights: All rights: Transit Lounge Release / Publication Date: 01 /02 /2015
Category:

This project has been assisted by the Australian government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body.

Description

Celia, Marcia, and Mickey meet and become friends in London. Searching for work and success in the theatre, they end up sharing a flat and a deep bond of friendship.

Set in Italy, London and Australia from the sixties to current times, Trio is the story of their complex personalities and relationships, of the betrayals and desires that threaten to undermine what is in hindsight most important to them. London is vibrantly alive in these pages, filled with music and drama, as is eighties and contemporary Perth, Australia, and Calabria, Italy. But at its heart this is a novel about love and friendship, loss and memory; about three unforgettable characters, and the special moments in all our lives that, through perceived hurt or fear, sometimes threaten to fall away and be lost forever. In this, her fourth novel, Geraldine Wooller captures with masterful wit and intelligence, and without a hint of sentimentality the essence of the human predicament.

Reading Group Notes for Trio are now available for download here

‘A marvel of concise eloquence, artful storytelling and finely wrought insight.’

Alice Nelson, Sydney Morning Herald Young Novelist of the Year 2009

‘Wooller’s language is the essence of realism, it has the indelible tinge of truth.’

Neville Cohn, Oz Arts Review

Geraldine Wooller was born in Perth and started travelling at the age of twenty, living in London for two years, then later in Rome also for two years, and later in Sydney.

In London she worked in the Earl’s Court Exhibition building’s cafeteria, in the industrial canteen, dishing Yorkshire Pudding and then Spotted Dick onto plates for the workers. Later she trained as a comptometer operator and earned her living thus for several years.

In Rome in the late 1960s she worked as a bilingual secretary for an executive in an American company, where she ran up and down stairs in between taking down letters in almost indecipherable shorthand.

In the 1970s she took out a degree in Italian and Linguistics from The University of Western Australia and subsequently completed a Diploma in Education.

Since then she has worked in a number of positions in Western Australian universities and as a teacher of European languages.

Still later she trained as a teacher of English as a Second Language and worked for some years as a teacher at Perth TAFE.

Trio is her fourth novel. Her second novel, The Seamstress, was shortlisted for the Barbara Jefferis Award, the Western Australian Premier’s Award and long listed for The International Dublin IMPAC Award.

… compelling and believable … Wooller’s prose is impeccable … engrossing.
Jay Daniel Thompson, Australian Book Review

Studded with pithy little life lessons and hard won insights, Trio moves at a meditative pace, one that will suit readers who prefer a reflective rather than an action driven novel. Wooller seeks to address life’s big questions of love, loss, grief and growing old: how do we live, where do we belong and how do we become who we are? After life has ‘belted her about a bit’, Celia finally concedes that the most important relationship she will ever have is with herself.
Sally Keighery, Readings Monthly http://www.readings.com.au/products/19057012/trio

… wise and thoughtful.
Lisa Hill, http://anzlitlovers.com/2015/04/10/trio-by-geraldine-wooller/

Wooller reveals the contradictions of inner life with limpid intelligence, and achieves difficult effects, such as weaving a complex sense of nostalgia without collapsing into sentiment.
Cameron Woodhead, Age/ Sydney Morning Herald
http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/books/in-short-fiction-by-tatiana-salem-levy-alan-gold-geraldine-wooller-sunmi-hwang-20150216-13fp4h.html

The author ponders the nature of secrets and acknowledges what is unspoken can still be destructive towards a relationship.
Amanda Ellis, The West Australian